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Palm Ash Glaze Variations

Inspired by the original Fisker’s Palm Ash, which came out of another series of glaze tests, I decided to try and find the potential of the local palm tree frond ash that I’ve been burning down and collecting. I designed the experiment to include a reduction and soda fired firing, and several clay bodies for more information. All tiles were dipped at the same time. All glazes were mixed wet and sieved through a 60m sieve. I wanted to zero in on interesting effects – and probably found one for everyone!

Batches were 50g Dry material –> ~35cc H2O

The Clay bodies are from left to right, respectively:

Reduction Fired Studio Mix – Soda Fired 550 Porcelain – Soda Fired Studio Mix – Soda Fired Fiske Iron SW

First, the original recipe with a new batch of burned ash. Notice how it looks not much like the original Fisker’s West Palm Ash. This is because I made a much larger batch, and this time washed the ash to eliminate application issues. Still an interesting glaze! Notice the blushing in standard reduction.

Palm Ash 45 - Nepheline Syenite 45 - Redart 10

Palm Ash 45 – Nepheline Syenite 45 – Redart 10

Next a few variations on high-iron clays.

Palm Ash 45 - Nepheline Syenite 45 - Alberta Slip 10

Palm Ash 45 – Nepheline Syenite 45 – Alberta Slip 10

Palm Ash 45 - Nepheline Syenite 45 - Lizella 10

Palm Ash 45 – Nepheline Syenite 45 – Lizella 10

Palm Ash 45 - Nepheline Syenite 45 - Barnard 10

Palm Ash 45 – Nepheline Syenite 45 – Barnard 10

Surprising that the Barnard had such a dramatic change in the color. The Lizella and Alberta clays are behaving similarly as colorants in the Ash Glazes as they do in Celadon base recipes.

Next, and experiment to substitute the Palm Ash, with a standard Wood Ash. This ask was mostly Oak, collected from a fireplace, unwashed, and sieved @ 60m.

Wood Ash 45 - Nepheline Syenite 45 - Redart 10

Wood Ash 45 – Nepheline Syenite 45 – Redart 10

Now we have the whim. What happens when I replace the feldspar with Volcanic Ash? I was told the material I had stockpiled was from Mt. St. Helens. Very cool idea. Even cooler results. Gotta say, this one knocked me over – – I talk a lot about accidents and whims and crazy chances… this is one that makes all the duds worth while. All those hours with a irritating dust mask and an annoying fume hood are forgotten when you pull out stuff like this!

Palm Ash 45 - Volcanic Ash 30 - Custer 15

Palm Ash 45 – Volcanic Ash 30 – Custer 15

Palm Ash 45 - Volcanic Ash 30 - Custer 15

Palm Ash 45 – Volcanic Ash 30 – Custer 15

What series would be complete without the kitchen sink? And a different feldspar for good measure. Looks close to the Barnard, huh?

Palm Ash 45 - Kona Feldspar 45 - Red Iron Oxide 5 - Rutile 2 - Tin 1 - Redart 4

Palm Ash 45 – Kona Feldspar 45 – Red Iron Oxide 5 – Rutile 2 – Tin 1 – Redart 4

Increase the % of Feldspar, Decrease the % of Ash.

Palm Ash 37 - Nepheline Syenite 57 - Redart 10

Palm Ash 37 – Nepheline Syenite 57 – Redart 10

A daydream as the result of drinking Corona on Palm Beach in a lawn chair with Kay. What if I made a glaze out of Palm Beach? Expect a revisit of this one to get the proportions just right. The red stoneware got bashed with soda, hence the fluxing… I’m not done with this one. Major novelty potential here!

Palm Ash 33 - Beach Sand 33 - Calcined Seashells 33 - Redart 10

Palm Ash 33 – Beach Sand 33 – Calcined Seashells 33 – Redart 10

And in the interest of keeping it simple, a 3 parter. Also a test to see how close my Volcanic ash was to feldspar. Surprisingly close, evidently. Seems to be about the most stable of the lot, while still exhibiting the fluid, runny, streaming, hare’s fur-esque characteristics I’m into. A lot more potential here too!

Palm Ash 33 - Volcanic Ash 33 - Redart 33

Palm Ash 33 – Volcanic Ash 33 – Redart 33

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